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Black Navy Personnel Disciplined For Sitting, ‘Black Power Salute’ During National Anthem

Obama’s Navy: One faces Naval Administrative Action, one lost her Security Clearance!

Colin Kaepernick, the millionaire, started the phenomenon of protesting the National Anthem. As annoying and hypocritical as that may be, he is a civilian, and has the right to do so.

Military personnel are subject to other sets of rules, not least among them is called the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Two black sailors are in trouble for emulating Kaepernick.

One unnamed sailor, who was dumb enough to personally film her protest, and post it on Social Media (video below,) has faced military action for her buffoonery.  She actually posted an eight and one-half minute video, showing the Flag being raised and the National Anthem being played. During the morning “colors,” she raised her fist in the Black Power Salute.

Watch her corny video below:

This particular sailor is stationed at the Naval Air Technical Training Center in Pensacola.

The funniest part? This sailor would not have been caught if she had not posted online.

Another sailor, Janaye Ervin, is in trouble for the following Twitter post:

Ervin is an Intelligence Specialist, and she lost her security clearance for her actions.

Opinions vary on the actions of these two sailors.

One person tweeted:

In defense of the protesting sailor, we find this:

Again, Service Members are held to a different standard, and different sets of rules than civilians.

Navy Regulation 1205 requires sailors to stand and salute, or place their hand over their heart, during the playing of the National Anthem.

The story of these two military members has gained attention in the media.

Take a look:

The Navy has responded to these recent actions.

“Sailors will receive training on the appropriate usage of social media and must not use it to discredit the Naval Service, and should be reminded it could potentially be used as evidence against them,” it warns.

“While military personnel are not excluded from the protections granted by the First Amendment, the US Supreme Court has stated that the different character of our community and of the military mission requires a different application of those protections.”

What do you think? Do these military members have the right to protest the way a civilian like Colin Kaepernick does?

They may believe so, but the military has a different view.


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