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Heart-breaking VIDEO Shows 2-Year-Old Tugging On Overdosed Mom’s Arm

“Please, stand up. Please…”

Sometimes, it seems that the latest Internet fad is to show photos and videos of horrible parents, and to share the sadness of the children. On the other hand, many times these children, and their parents, get help when found in a horrible situation.

Hopefully, this will be one of those cases.

Please, do not be upset at the person who shot this video, as it will be used as evidence when trying to get the two-year-old girl some help..

Distractify reports:

The Salem, New Hampshire woman is being accused of child endangerment. Her daughter is currently in protective Custody with the Department of Children and Families.

Lawrence, Massachusetts police Chief James Fitzpatrick said that although the scene was shocking, it is sadly all too common of an occurrence.

“It’s very disturbing to see someone obviously in the matter of addiction where it overtakes someone where they’re not able to take care of their child, leaves their child vulnerable.”

Police mentioned they wished the bystander helped the child but said that the mother’s drug paraphernalia, along with the footage, will assist in placing the child in a safer home.

Authorities believe that the girl’s mother overdosed on an opiate, possibly fentanyl or an oral version of heroin.

What’s even sadder is that in the majority of these overdose cases, children are present about 10 percent of the time, Lawrence officers said.

“They can see firsthand the power of the narcotic and fentanyl. She’s lucky to be alive and you see someone in the throes of addiction like that, and what they’re willing to sacrifice.”

Watch the video below:

DISTURBING VIDEO: A 2-year-old child is seen screaming as her mother lays limp in a store. Police in Massachusetts said on Channel 11 Morning News that they hope sharing it will alert people to the horrific consequences of drug use.

Is there hope for someone like this mother? According to this man, there is:

I know how to quit heroin because I’ve done it. And you can too. I’ve been sober from heroin and other mind-altering substances for two years. Not particularly long when it comes to staying sober from alcohol or marijuana. Heroin, however, is a different animal.

This article is structure to reflect the process that usually occurs when someone quits heroin. There’s the precovery stage, where a heroin addict wants to get sober but can’t quit. This stage can sometimes last years, but it can be expedited with the exercises listed below.

Then there’s the withdrawal and detox phase. A lot of people can’t quit heroin because of painful withdrawal symptoms. I’ll show you that, regardless of your method of heroin detox, it is possible to fight through heroin withdrawal.

Next there’s early recovery. This phase is usually defined as anyone with less than one year sober from mind-altering substances. During this time, many people relapse due to post-acute withdrawal symptoms or a weak program of recovery. Heroin addicts who stay sober for one year or longer usually follow four simple suggestions. They actively work with a sponsor, designate a home group, meditate regularly and have sober friends.

Finally, there’s the long-term recovery phase. In this stage, a heroin addict has been sober for more than one year, is stable financially and emotionally and works a solid program of recovery.

Unfortunately dope is hardest drug to stop abusing. It beats out cocaine, crack cocaine, methamphetamine, prescription drugs and alcohol in the difficulty department. That’s the bad news.

The good news is sustained sobriety – consistent abstinence – from heroin is possible. It’s no walk in the park. But most good things in life require commitment and perseverance. Staying sober from heroin is no different.

Continue Reading At Discovery Place

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