Radicals Furious Over South Carolina’s Latest Ban

Another state jumps on the bandwagon and joins several others in protecting our country from Islamic law. South Carolina has joined in and banned Sharia law from being used as a defense in court, stating that radical Islam has declared war on the U.S.

According to Conservative Post,

According to recent reports, South Carolina is the latest state to publicly join in on protecting our country from Islamic Shariah law.

Reports indicate that a bill is going through the State House that strives to ban Shariah and any other foreign laws from being used as a defense in state courts.

The action stems from the suppression and brutality outlined in Shariah, and a concern that Americans today aren’t properly protected from religion being used in the courtroom.

Lawmakers in South Carolina are following the footsteps of several other states that have already taken similar actions. The country attempted a similar bill in 2010, but it did not received enough votes to pass.

“Radical Islam has declared war on the United States of America,” claims Republican State Rep. Chip Limehouse.

“They’ve captured journalists and reporters and cut their heads off, so a little small change in the law that’s pushing back and saying what we’re all about is kind of a good thing for South Carolina.”

This action by South Carolina seems to be just the beginning of a new movement sweeping across the U.S. This is a direct result of the rise in tensions with the Islamic nation over the past couple of years and did not have to end up this way. What do you think, is South Carolina right in banning Shariah law or are are they being racially biased against the Islamic nation?

H/T: Conservative Post


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