U.S. Troops Face All-New Threat: Flying IEDs

Hey, if Amazon can use them, it’s only natural that they would eventually be used as weapons.

Combat warfare recently entered a new chapter where America’s adversaries can successfully deliver explosives via cheap, commercially available unmanned aircraft (drones). This new tactic is challenging the U.S. military and causing them to go on the defensive.

An explosives-loaded Islamic State militant group killed two Kurdish peshmerga troops and injured two French paratroopers. These casualties happened early this month in Iraq, Patriot Tribune reported. It is considered the first run-through the militant group has caused such losses.

The drone detonated while it was being reviewed subsequent to being shot down, Air Force Col. John Dorrian, Operation Inherent Resolve representative, affirmed Wednesday.

“We’ve seen several reports about ISIS use of commercial off-the-shelf drones, including instances where they’ve used these capabilities to deliver explosives,” Dorrian told journalists in a Pentagon video chat from Baghdad, Iraq.

“It’s a risk that is not new to the region,” he said, calling the assault a Trojan Horse-style assault.

Nor is it the first attempt made by ISIS.

There are no less than two different occurrences in the course of the most recent month that ISIS has attempted to utilize automatons to convey explosives, as per The New York Times.

The two peshmerga troops were slaughtered Oct. 2, as indicated by a U.S. official, who said the drone resembled a Styrofoam model plane that was taped together in an exceptionally simple style, as indicated by The Associated Press. The authority said it gave off an impression of being conveying a C4 charge and batteries, and may have had a clock on it,  AP reported.

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