Politics

Huma Abedin’s FATHER: Muslims Have the Right To ‘Take Up Arms’ For Allah

Syed Zain Abedin, father of Huma Abedin, and Saudi-sponsored Islamist scholar believes that “every self-respecting Muslim is an Islamic fundamentalist” and Muslims have the right to “take up arms” for Allah. “Islam permits the use of forceful means,” and that carrying out martyrdom operations may be necessary in the cause of Allah.” A horrifying thought coming from someone who is the father of Hillary’s right hand woman.

According to Huma’s father, Muslims aren’t like people of other faiths and can never fully assimilate. Huma herself recently professed to being a “practicing Muslim.”

Counter Jihad has the story:

There are occasions when Islam calls for the ultimate sacrifice,” he said, as long as it is done in “the cause” of Allah and not for selfish reasons such as individual suicide.

Abedin also said Muslims have a “relentless obligation” to convert non-Muslims in the West to Islam, though he counseled Muslims living in non-Muslim majority countries to be patient in going about Islamizing their hosts. As the minority, they do not have the numbers for “conquest” and have to be aware of “certain strategic necessities, certain political imperatives.”

He pointed out that even after Western political systems are “subdued,” it may take hundreds of years before citizens formerly living under those secular systems fully accept Islam.

“The immediate goals and targets for Muslims to pursue when they are the majority in any society are distinct from the goals and targets they should pursue when they are living as a minority in any society,” Abedin explained in the 1991 interview with the Saudi Gazette, a leading daily newspaper published in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

He advised winning over the “kuffar, the deniers,” with “little acts of kindness.” Whatever the tactics, he added, “There can be no let-up” in converting them to the “Islamic way.”

“Muslims have to continue to formulate their attitudes and behavior on the assumption that kufr is not a fixed, but a volatile and transient category. Today’s nay-sayers may well be tomorrow’s yes-sayers,” Abedin said. “This happened daily in Makkah (Mecca), the historical Makkah. Why would it be different in today’s Makkah, in today’s situation where Muslims are a persecuted and despised minority?”

He asserted that the “due” for deniers of the Quran is “rejection by God” and eternal Hellfire. But he said that Islamic states should take care to not mistreat “non-Muslim minorities living in our midst, as citizens of our state, as beneficiaries of our trust, whom we call dhimmah.”

Abedin described himself as a proud Islamic fundamentalist and said “the need and source” of any social movement must be “traced back to Islam” for legitimacy.

“I consider myself a fundamentalist,” he said. “And I am proud of it.”

In fact, he added, “Every self-respecting Muslim, wherever he resides and whatever his politics, is at heart an Islamic fundamentalist.”

Islamic fundamentalism includes belief in violent jihad, he said, which may be necessary under certain circumstances for Muslim minorities to carry it out against non-Muslim majorities.

“This is a rather complex subject,” Abedin cautioned.

“There are occasions when Islam permits the use of forceful means to remove the impediments faced by a Muslim community in its efforts to lead an Islamic life,” he explained. “You can take up arms if you are being denied the freedom and practice of belief.”

But he said there are rules, such as proportionality, and procedures that must be followed in jihad: “It’s not that once you decide that such a people are in the way of your allegiance and worship to God, you manufacture a bomb and wipe them off the surface of the earth.”

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