Pillsbury SHOCKS Viewers With Hidden Message in This Holiday Commercial – 3%
culture

Pillsbury SHOCKS Viewers With Hidden Message in This Holiday Commercial

In this time of cultural uncertainty pillsbury chose to show a family Praying together, rather than showing two men sharing a biscuit roll with their adopted child.

Below you will see the Pillsbury ad, and below that you will see the contrast of a Campbell’s ad.
If you think that we need more ads like the one Pillsbury has done this holiday season, make sure and let them know! When we boycott, we should inversely buycott brands that do things we like. We have listed some possible ways to connect with Pilsbury and let them know what you think! You can comment on the Facebook video itself or send them an email:

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This is where the inspiration for this commercial came from:

Adage reports:

Pillsbury has a new marketing plan designed to help the dough brand emerge from a slump that’s somewhat self-inflicted and somewhat market-inflicted.

The General Mills brand has seen sales drop in recent years as it scaled back brand support — the company spent less than $63.1 million on U.S. measured media for Pillsbury last year, a 20.8% drop from 2015, according to an Ad Age Datacenter analysis from Kantar Media. Meanwhile, dough sales for General Mills fell 7% to $1.69 billion in fiscal 2017.

Compare that to the rise of in-store bakeries, up 3.5 percent to 4 percent annually in sales. That category should approach $19.4 billion by 2022, a 40 percent jump from 2012, according to market research firm Mintel.

“In more recent years, we’ve lost engagement from our heaviest buyers,” admits Joanna Hargus, Pillsbury’s senior marketing manager. “This is as more families are outsourcing the making of food that they used to make at home.”

So Pillsbury’s team headed to Kentucky, Tennessee and Iowa to visit some of the brand’s “super fans,” says Hargus, who joined the Pillsbury team in 2016 after working on sibling brand Yoplait.

Even conducting research that far away from major cities and suburbs was a departure for the brand. But Pillsbury needed to find ways to deepen its connection with small town and rural, often large, families, particularly in the South and Midwest, who tend to buy more of its biscuits, cinnamon rolls and other products.

Pillsbury Doughboy and Team Rules
Pillsbury Doughboy and Team Rules Credit: General Mills

The campaign’s key insight came from the homes they visited, which overwhelmingly displayed some sort of “family rules” signs. You know the ones, boards purchased or hand-painted with declarations such as be grateful, laugh often and support each other. Some version appeared in almost 90 percent of the homes Pillsbury visited, Hargus recalls. They were, quite literally, signs from the brand’s core consumers that helped shape its “Made at Home” campaign, which broke late this month and will be amplified as the winter holiday season approaches.

Read the rest: Adage

 

The video below this text is the campbells commercial depicting two dads and their ‘son’….

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A homosexual “married” couple is featured prominently with a young boy (their son) in the new Campbell’s Soup advertisement. Campbell’s #RealRealLife campaign aims to change the face of the American family. It starts off with the first man feeding soup to the little boy and in a “Star Wars” Darth Vader voice says, “Luke, I am your father.” Then the other man enters the scene and says, “No, Luke, I am your father.” How confusing for this little boy and for all children viewing this commercial. Obviously, Campbell’s is sending the message that homosexual men are raising children, whom they wouldn’t have if a woman wasn’t involved, and they are ok with it.

Campbell’s Soup is glorifying this unnatural marriage. One Million Moms believes family is based on love, but this does not justify normalizing sin. 1MM does not agree with the need for Campbell’s to support same sex marriages or couples.

Companies should advertise the quality of their products. It is no longer about the product but about their cause. They should not be highlighting who is attracted to whom or who sleeps with whom. This is a marketing decision Campbell’s will regret.

This gay-inclusive commercial is attempting to desensitize viewers. There is concern about the way this ad is pushing the LGBT agenda, but an even greater concern is the way that they are attempting to redefine “family” and “real marriage.”

 

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