[VIDEO] BACKDOOR GUN CONTROL: D.C. sets impossible hurdles for carry permits


Photo by: ANDREW HARNIK Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier, left, is on hand as D.C. public officials speak to the media about emergency legislation to amend District laws to conforming to the court's recent Palmer v. District of Columbia ruling on the DistrictÕs gun laws during a press conference at the Wilson Building, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, September 17, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

The District’s newly minted concealed carry laws require gun owners seeking permits to complete 18 hours of firearms training.

One problem: As of Wednesday, the day before a court-ordered deadline for the permitting process to begin, no instructors had been approved to teach the compulsory course.

The disparity is emblematic of the city’s reluctant scramble to comply with the July order that overturned the District’s ban on carrying handguns in public.

Photo by: ANDREW HARNIK Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier, left, is on hand as D.C. public officials speak to the media about emergency legislation to amend District laws to conforming to the court's recent Palmer v. District of Columbia ruling on the DistrictÕs gun laws during a press conference at the Wilson Building, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, September 17, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
(Photo by Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

The District’s newly minted concealed carry laws require gun owners seeking permits to complete 18 hours of firearms training.



One problem: As of Wednesday, the day before a court-ordered deadline for the permitting process to begin, no instructors had been approved to teach the compulsory course.

The disparity is emblematic of the city’s reluctant scramble to comply with the July order that overturned the District’s ban on carrying handguns in public.

The Metropolitan Police Department, working off legislation adopted by D.C. lawmakers last month, released the concealed carry applications on its website at about 7 p.m. Wednesday — hours before the stay of U.S. District Court Judge Frederick J. Scullin Jr.’s order was set to expire.

The regulations firm up the details of the application process, including establishing a $75 cost to apply for a permit.



But it’s unlikely anyone will be walking out of police headquarters with the license anytime soon.

George Lyon, a firearms instructor and one of four gun owners involved in the court case that overturned the D.C. ban on carrying guns in public, said a $435 certification fee might discourage some trainers from applying.

“This is another example of them making the process as difficult and expensive as possible,” Mr. Lyon said.

Source: Washington Times





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