[VIDEO] Snoop Dogg Marches On LAPD Headquarters: Is He Helping?


What do you think of Snoop Dog’s message? Is he on to something? 

I, for one, believe that he is helping and unifying people. Watch below:

Rappers and Los Angeles-area natives the Game and Snoop Dogg led a unification march for men of color Friday morning to the LAPD’s graduation of its newest officers, hours after five Dallas police officers were shot and killed and seven others were wounded during a sniper attack.

About 6:30 a.m., the Game posted on his Instagram account a call for black, Mexican and men of all races to march to the Los Angeles Police Department’s headquarters to “make the Californian government & it’s law branches aware that from today forward, we will be UNIFIED as minorities & we will no longer allow them to hunt us or be hunted by us !!!”

He said women and children should stay away, “THIS IS OUR MISSION FOR THEM,” he wrote.



The Game, a Compton native whose legal name is Jayceon Terrell Taylor, said in his announcement the march had to be peaceful.

“Do not: bring any weapons or anything illegal. Do not come high or belligerent … We don’t need any HOT HEADS or anyone there for the wrong reasons… We will stand as we are, UNIFIED. I’m calling ALL GANGS, ALL RACES, ALL GROWN MEN affiliated or not & we will stand UNIFIED.”

Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 5.36.11 AM Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 5.36.25 AM

Snoop Dogg, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, said organizers didn’t know there was an LAPD recruit graduation scheduled for Friday morning. The point of the march was to reintroduce the Police Department to members of the community it serves, he told reporters at the scene.

About 50 men joined the march to LAPD headquarters.



“The mission is to reintroduce our community to the LAPD… just to get some understanding and dialogue,” he said. “We’re the ones they’re going to be dealing with, we’re the ones that are going to be pulled over. … We’re here on peace.”

The group began planning the march before dawn, the Game said. Organizers spoke with marchers about their unifying, peaceful message so it couldn’t be misconstrued by police, and conversely, so they would listen when law enforcement responded.

“We don’t have to fear each other today,” he said.

Continue Reading At The LA Times





Previous [VIDEO] Armed Or Unarmed? How Quickly Could You Make That Decision?
Next BREAKING: Hostage Situation Explodes; Police Officer Shot And SWAT Is Now Moving In